Jukurrpa. Dreaming.Story.Law

Jukurrpa. Dreaming.Story.Law

The speech community of the Warlpiri, one of approximately 170 remaining languages of the indigenous people of Australia, lives in Central Australia and their culture goes back to a life as nomads in the desert.

The Warlpiri in Yuendumu are a very traditional people whose life in the desert still is strongly influenced by Jukurrpa. The word Jukurrpa describes the profound identification that links the indigenous Australians to their land. The knowledge about Jukurrpa, as well as the power and energy of the ancestors, is maintained in dance, song and art.

Today the Warlpiri paint their stories with acrylics on canvas. For them their art is an important alternative to maintain their culture in addition it helps to convey Jukurrpa to the younger generation. Walpiri people manage the balancing act to maintain their old traditions and connection to their land and ancestors, while producing art which has significance and monetary value in Western society. This is what their pieces of art tell us about them.

Yuendumu, NT, Australia, 2010

The speech community of the Warlpiri, one of approximately 170 remaining languages of the indigenous people of Australia, lives in Central Australia and their culture goes back to a life as nomads in the desert.

The Warlpiri in Yuendumu are a very traditional people whose life in the desert still is strongly influenced by Jukurrpa. The word Jukurrpa describes the profound identification that links the indigenous Australians to their land. The knowledge about Jukurrpa, as well as the power and energy of the ancestors, is maintained in dance, song and art.

Today the Warlpiri paint their stories with acrylics on canvas. For them their art is an important alternative to maintain their culture in addition it helps to convey Jukurrpa to the younger generation. Walpiri people manage the balancing act to maintain their old traditions and connection to their land and ancestors, while producing art which has significance and monetary value in Western society. This is what their pieces of art tell us about them.

Yuendumu, NT, Australia, 2010